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2 edition of Medieval chantries and chantry chapels found in the catalog.

Medieval chantries and chantry chapels

G. H. Cook

Medieval chantries and chantry chapels

by G. H. Cook

  • 306 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Phoenix House .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby G.H. Cook.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL20360875M

Page 24 of note 2 This estimate includes several chantries about which little or nothing is known except for the appearance of a licence for alienation in mortmain on the royal patent rolls. The York evidence therefore leads to a conclusion somewhere between the extreme view of Professor Jordan (Philanthropy in England, , [London, ], 51) that ‘it was quite uncommon for a chantry.   Chantries were often established in parish churches and the famous Worcester White Book is full of examples from the early fourteenth century. Places mentioned with chantries include: Elmley Castle, Kempsey, Ettington (near Stratford), Blockley, Erdington, Hartlebury, Chelmscote (now a deserted village near Brailes), Bordesley, Stratford.

These masses were to take place in the new chantry chapel of St John, built against the south side of the parish church chancel. Immediately to the left of the chapel's altar, the tomb of the. William Wyggeston's chantry house, built around , in Leicester: the building housed two priests, who served at a chantry chapel in the nearby St Mary de Castro church. It was sold as a private dwelling after the dissolution of the chantries. Following the Reformation in England initiated by King Henry VIII, Parliament passed an Act in which defined chantries as representing misapplied.

  The chantry was a phenomenon of the later middle ages whose origins have never been satisfactorily explained. It is argued here that what led to its emergence in the thirteenth century was the inability of the monastic orders, at a time of rising population and increasing awareness of the pains of Purgatory, to cope with the growing demand for intercessory masses.   journal of Meclieval History ELSEVIER Journal of Medieval History 20 () Chapels and chantries in late medieval and early modern Besann: the record book of Jean Ferreux, chaplain Marie Richards* Wolfson College, Oxford, UK Abstract During the fifteenth-century reform of the Poor Clares by St Colette, many new convents were built in France and Flanders Their chapels were .


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Medieval chantries and chantry chapels by G. H. Cook Download PDF EPUB FB2

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels [George Henry Cook] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. This book offers a thematic approach to such monuments, combining archaeological approaches with relevant documentary sources and discussing aspects of chantry chapel foundation, design and spatial arrangements, as well as their origins Cited by: 4.

The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology - Simon Roffey - Google Books. The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's Reviews: 1.

The eleven essays presented here lead the reader through the earliest manifestations of the chantry, the origins and development of ‘stone-cage’ chapels, royal patronage of commemorative art and architecture, the chantry in the late medieval parish, the provision of music and textiles, and a series of specific chantries created for William of Wykeham, Edmund Audley, Thomas Spring and Abbot Islip, to the eventual history and the cultural consequences.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Cook, George Henry. Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. London, Phoenix House [] (OCoLC) It shows how the use of archaeological approaches can illuminate aspects of medieval religious practice only hinted at in many historical documents; it also demonstrates how the structural and spatial analysis of former chantry chapels can shed light on the level of private and communal piety and reveal a wider, more universal, context to chantry foundation in the medieval parish church.

Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels. [G H Cook] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help. Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for Contacts Search for a Library. Create Book: All Authors / Contributors: G H Cook. Find more information about: OCLC Number: Notes: First impression June Second impression.

He discusses such chapels from the perspectives of early origins and influences on later chantry foundation, form and fabric in southern and western England, the social and religious context, and other aspects. Black and white photographs are included, along with diagrams showing arrangements of chantries and sight lines within churches.

[10] For a definition of the parclose type, see Cook, Medieval Chantries, [11] Rites of Durham, [12] VCH [13] VCH [14] These simpler monuments possessed the freedom to be placed in a variety of structures, such as independent chapels, chapter houses and cloister walks.

The chantry -- a special, often private, chapel within a church dedicated to a particular benefactor or benefactor's family, where prayers for the benefactor's soul were said -- was probably the most common, and also one of the most distinctive, of all late medieval religious foundations.

The eleven essays presented here lead the reader through the earliest manifestations of the chantry, the origins and development of ‘stone-cage’ chapels, royal patronage of commemorative art and architecture, the chantry in the late medieval parish, the provision of music and textiles, and a series of specific chantries created for William of Wykeham, Edmund Audley, Thomas Spring and Abbot Islip, to the eventual history and the cultural consequences.

That it was quite distinct from the free Lady Chapel within the churchyard is shown by the inventories of andand by the will of Richard Colyn desiring that a chaplain should celebrate before the image of the Virgin in the church. Only two perpetual chantry chapels existed in the church when Edward VI suppressed all chantries in Marie-Hélène Rousseau has written this book on the perpetual chantries of the old St.

Paul’s Cathedral based on the rich archive in the Guildhall Library, London, in conjunction with other sources. The author has provided a concise and clear introduction to the subject of chantries alongside a very detailed and comprehensive account of this feature of the life of the cathedral.

In this short and suggestive book, Dr Simon Roffey examines 81 surviving chantry chapels in parish churches in three counties: Hampshire (18), Wiltshire (27) and Somerset (36). The rationale for this selection is not given and the title of the book is a little misleading, although Roffey does discuss chapels elsewhere in England.

Three periods dominate the historiography of the medieval English chantry. In each, the single most important determinant was the Reformation. In the sixteenth century reformist criticism of chantries and the theology that underpinned them created a censorial strain that.

In late medieval England chantries were the most popular type of religious foundation and could be founded at existing altars, in existing chapels, or involved the building of an external or free-standing chapel.

Cage chantries were physically separate chapels erected within existing churches in. The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology Barron, Caroline M.

B O O K R EV I EW S The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology, by Simon Roffey (Woodbridge: Boydell P., ; pp. 40). In this short and suggestive book, Dr Simon Roffey examines 81 surviving chantry chapels in parish churches in three counties: Hampshire (18).

The medieval chantry in England. by Julian M. Luxford and John McNeill. The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An Archaeology (Studies in the History of Medieval Religion) Simon Roffey. Hardcover. £ Mediaeval chantries and chantry chapels George Henry Cook. Hardcover. 10 offers from £ Traditions of Death and Burial (Shire Library) Helen Frisby.

out of 5 stars 6. Paperback. £ Reviews: 4. The Medieval Chantry Chapel: An archaeology Simon Roffey. The Boydell Press £40 () Church Times Bookshop £36 “IN MY Father’s house are many mansions.” The same could be said of medieval churches, which were buildings of several rooms, not single spaces as they tend to be used today.

In Richard Sparrow dies and he then uses the manor to found a chantry in the parish church dedicated to the Holy Trinity, the Virgin Mary, St. John the Evangelist, and All the Saints. It was quite a big manor and it created an extraordinarily well-endowed chantry. Blomefield says the chantry .Chantry Chapels and Medieval Strategies for the Afterlife Roffey.

out of 5 stars 4. Paperback. £ Next. Customers also viewed these products. Page 1 of 1 Start over Page 1 of 1. This shopping feature will continue to load items when the Enter key is pressed. In order to navigate out of this carousel please use your heading shortcut Author: George Henry Cook.The study of chantries and chantry chapels has much to offer the student of medieval history and religion, and overall this volume has much to contribute here.

Eleven essays are presented in this volume and lead the reader through a wide spectrum of monuments, foundations, and patterns of patronage.